Town of Riverdale Park Discriminates against Small Business Owner, Jury Awards Damages.

In May, JGL attorneys Levi Zaslow, Maritza Carmona and Tim Maloney won nearly
$260,000 in damages for their client, Mamoun “Mike” Ashkar, who faced ethnic
discrimination within his community of Riverdale Park in Prince George’s County. The
Washington Post has just published an article about this case as it has meaningful
impact on not just the Prince George’s County town but also for broader communities.
Mr. Ashkar, a Palestinian-American, became the owner of Greg’s Towing in January of
2015. Greg's Towing is the only tow company in the Town of Riverdale Park in Prince
George’s County and, for 30 years, it was the exclusive tow service provider for the
town and its police department. Once Mr. Ashkar took over Greg's Towing, he contacted
Town representatives, including the police dept., to continue the company's long
standing relationship with the Town, but he was denied the by the Town, its employees
and the police department through numerous instances that included derogatory
language, name-calling and discriminatory statements.

“My parents moved here because it’s supposed to be the land of the free,” Ashkar said.
“It’s made up of a lot of people. We all live together and this is what makes this country
up, people from all over . . . It’s a very normal life and I don’t know why they would think
otherwise.”

When JGL’s Levi Zaslow was asked about proving his client’s case, he stated, “In court,
the town asserted that it was their business decision to select an alternative towing
company since Greg’s Towing was temporarily removed from a list of county-approved
vendors as ownership was transitioning to Ashkar . . . We were able to systematically
show that each purported business decision was actually a pretext.”

Joseph, Greenwald and Laake, P.A. is proud to continue its longstanding tradition of
providing a voice to victims of discrimination, such as Mr. Ashkar.

To read the full story, click on link below.

Zaslow_WPost_GregTowing

Jay Holland speaks for the Maryland Association for Justice and Maryland Employment Lawyers Association

Earlier this week Jay Holland, Joseph Greenwald & Laake principal attorney, was a speaker at an event sponsored by the Maryland Employment Lawyers Association (MELA) and the Maryland Association for Justice (MAJ). The event’s topic was “Proving Emotional Distress.” The two organizations partnered together to bring this important discussion to both members and non-members. Holland, along with other speakers, shared personal success stories in proving emotional distress in the courtroom. The presentation was held at the MAJ headquarters in Columbia, MD.

“It was great to be part of this session since emotional distress damages are often at the core of sexual harassment and discrimination cases,” said Holland.

Jay Holland is a principal in JGL’s Civil Litigation Group, and the chair of the firm’s Labor, Employment and Qui Tam Whistleblower practice. He is a renowned employment and qui tam litigator known for taking on tough cases and achieving exceptional results.

Jay Holland tells Law360 that Kaepernick has a case but with obvious hurdles

Pro football player Colin Kaepernick has filed a grievance against the National Football League and Jay Holland has shared his opinion about it with Law360. Kaepernick claims that team owners schemed to keep him off the football field because of his protests against the national anthem, not his football ability.

Kaepernick’s legal team is reportedly expected to seek federal subpoenas in the next few weeks in order to get President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence to testify in the case.

Holland, known for his experience in employment law and civil litigation, said, “There are some significant hurdles even if it were an ordinary case with ordinary witnesses,” said Jay Holland, employment and civil rights attorney with Joseph Greenwald & Laake PA. “Obviously, this is an extraordinary case with extraordinary witnesses.”

“Just what is in the public domain, it seems pretty clear that the president, along with the vice president, sought to embarrass and politically damage the players who were engaging in and kneeling in protests during the national anthem and at times singling out Colin Kaepernick,” Holland said.

To read the full article, click HERE

Jay Holland is a principal in JGL’s Civil Litigation Group, and the chair of the firm’s Labor, Employment and Qui Tam Whistleblower practice. He is a renowned employment and qui tam litigator known for taking on tough cases and achieving exceptional results.

JGL Participates in Prince George’s County Bar Association Tort Law Seminar

On June 12th, Joseph Greenwald & Laake actively participated in the Prince George’s County Bar Association (PGCBAR) Tort Law Seminar. Attorney Timothy Maloney was a panelist and attorney Steve Vinick was the host of the event and moderated the panel discussion. The seminar took place at the Newton White Mansion in Mitchellville and was immediately followed by the PGCBAR annual meeting.

The theme of the seminar was “Common Mistakes of Trial Lawyers and How to Rectify Them,” and covered topics such as discovery strategy and errors, opening statements, direct and cross examination, expert testimony, closing statements and the use of technology. Maloney and the rest of the panelists talked for 5-10 minutes per topic and addressed questions from attendants as well as the moderator, Steve Vinick.

Maloney is a preeminent trial lawyer who has obtained millions of dollars in recoveries for his clients in a wide variety of matters, including civil rights, employment discrimination, whistleblower actions and high-stakes business litigation. He is a committed advocate for the public good who has held leadership roles with many civic and charitable organizations.

A principal in Joseph, Greenwald & Laake’s Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice and Civil Litigation practice groups, Steven Vinick has more than 20 years of experience in representing clients in matters including medical malpractice, personal injury and criminal defense. Over the course of that career, Steven has earned a reputation as a skilled litigator and highly effective courtroom advocate.

Jay Holland Shares His View of Discrimination Case with Law.com

Joseph, Greenwald & Laake principal Jay Holland was quoted in a Law.com article about the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. The Court held in favor of a bakery owner who declined, on religious grounds, to provide a cake for a gay couple’s wedding. When asked what are the takeaways of this case for employment attorneys, he said, “I could see the tables being turned to say that in a parallel situation, where a plaintiff brings a discrimination case and a commissioner or judge shows hostility because of who they are and their claims,” Holland said. “At the least the Supreme Court recognized and determined in this case that an individual was entitled to a fair and unbiased hearing as it pertains to their claim of discrimination.”

To read the full article, click on the link below.

Jay Holland is a principal in JGL’s Civil Litigation Group, and the chair of the firm’s Labor, Employment and Qui Tam Whistleblower practice. He is a renowned employment and qui tam litigator known for taking on tough cases and achieving exceptional results.

Labor of Law_lawcomHolland

 

Tim Maloney gives his perspective of the Maryland Democratic primary election-law case to The Daily Record

Maryland’s democratic primary election is quickly approaching but not without some interesting legal distractions. Valerie Ervin had been the running mate of Kevin Kamenetz in a tightly contested Democratic primary. When Kamenetz died unexpectedly, Ervin replaced him as a candidate for governor. In light of that, Ervin sought a court order requiring reprinted or altered ballots for the primary so as to have her name placed on the ballot as a gubernatorial candidate. A judge denied that request, and Ervin is considering an appeal. Joseph, Greenwald & Laake principal Timothy F. Maloney spoke with The Daily Record about this unusual situation.

Maloney, who frequently litigates election law issues, shared that lawsuits like Ervin’s face nearly insurmountable challenges. “These challenges almost always fail. The loser has to prove not only that a violation of election law occurred, but that the violation more than likely changed the outcome. That’s a big hill to climb,” states Maloney.

To read the article in its entirety, please click on the link below.

Maloney is a preeminent trial lawyer who has obtained millions of dollars in recoveries for his clients in a wide variety of matters, including civil rights, employment discrimination, whistleblower actions and high-stakes business litigation. He is a committed advocate for the public good who has held leadership roles with many civic and charitable organizations.

Full article: Maloney_Ervin election_TDR

Town of Riverdale Park Discriminates against Small Business Owner, Jury Awards Damages

On May 18th, JGL attorneys Levi Zaslow, Maritza Carmona and Tim Maloney won nearly $260,000 in damages for their client, Mamoun Ashkar, who faced ethnic discrimination within his community of Riverdale Park in Prince George’s County. The Daily Record has since published an article about this case as it has meaningful impact on not just the Prince George’s County town but also for broader communities.

Mr. Ashkar, a Palestinian-American, became the owner of Greg’s Towing in January of 2015. Greg’s Towing is the only tow company in the Town of Riverdale Park in Prince George’s County and, for 30 years, it was the exclusive tow service provider for the town and its police department. Once Mr. Ashkar took over Greg’s Towing, he contacted Town representatives, including the police dept., to continue the company’s long standing relationship with the Town, but he was denied the by the Town, its employees and the police department through numerous instances that included derogatory language, name-calling and discriminatory statements.

“Local government cannot discriminate against its citizens and this case is about fairness, justice and equality and this verdict speaks to that,” Levi S. Zaslow told The Daily Record on Tuesday May 22nd. “We are very open to sitting down with the town and speaking about these practices and ensuring a fair and equitable process going forward.”

Joseph, Greenwald and Laake, P.A. is proud to continue its longstanding tradition of providing a voice to victims of discrimination, such as Mr. Ashkar.

To read the full story, click here: Tow company owner awarded $259K in discrimination lawsuit against Prince George’s town

Timothy Maloney Emcees Event in Honor of Senator’s Birthday and New Autobiography

Tim Maloney recently served as host for a special event to discuss a memoir by his good friend and colleague former Maryland Senator Joseph D. Tydings. Tim has known Tydings since he campaigned for Senate in Prince George’s County in 1964. At the event, Tim Maloney included some his own memories as he teed up questions for Joe Tydings and his co-writer and former Sun reporter, John W. Frece. The memoir, “My Life in Progressive Politics: Against the Grain,” is surprisingly timely. Tydings looks back on a life of public service, from the Maryland General Assembly to chief federal prosecutor in Maryland and ultimately to the United States Senate.

The celebration took place at the University of Maryland’s Samual Riggs IV Alumni Center and included about 80 attendees. “It was a true honor to be a prominent part of such a remarkable event,” stated Maloney. “Tydings has had a wonderful influence on both my personal and professional life,” he continued.

Tydings’ book, titled “My Life in Progressive Politics: Against the Grain,” was published in late April and documents his career as he fought for progressive issues like gun control, healthcare and environmental protection.

William F. Zorzi provides a detailed and personal description of the celebration in an article found on Maryland Matters, a website that delivers news about Maryland government and politics. In this article, he shares, “The session was anything but a melancholy occasion; it was at times hysterically funny, rather than some sort of lament for the past.” To read more about the event, click here.

Timothy Maloney argues for Maryland Public Information Act transparency at the Court of Appeals

On May 7, Joseph Greenwald & Laake principal attorney Timothy Maloney argued in the Maryland Court of Appeals regarding whether or not a state agency supervisor’s personal notes about an employee are required to be disclosed to a worker under the Maryland Public Information Act. The Court heard competing slippery-slope arguments about the case.

Maloney argued that the MPIA’s transparency would be violated if supervisors could place their personnel information in a private folder and exempt them from disclosure by labeling them as private. However, the opposing side argued that compelling disclosure would invade privacy of supervisors.

The issue stems from the case of Bernadette Lamson, an employee of the Montgomery County attorney’s office, is entitled to the personal notes her employer kept in her personal moleskin journal. The Montgomery County Circuit Court and the intermediate Court of Special Appeals have upheld the denial of Lamson’s MPIA request.

Maloney said, “There is only one reason she took those notes. She was acting a public government supervisor.”

Maloney is a preeminent trial lawyer who has obtained millions of dollars in recoveries for his clients in a wide variety of matters, including civil rights, employment discrimination, whistleblower actions and high-stakes business litigation. He is a committed advocate for the public good who has held leadership roles with many civic and charitable organizations.

To read the article, click on the link below:

MD High court weighs if MPIA requires disclosure of supervisor’s notes

Timothy Maloney speaks to MD Daily Record on Hogan recess appointment case

Joseph Greenwald & Laake principal attorney Timothy Maloney spoke at the Court of Appeals on May 7 regarding a case in which the General Assembly withheld the salaries of acting Health Secretary Dennis R. Schrader and former acting Planning Secretary Wendi Peters. Maloney represents both secretaries, and was quoted in the Maryland Daily Record.

The case asks whether or not Maryland’s top court believes Governor Larry Hogan used recess appointments in an acceptable way following the withdrawal of their nominations from Senate consideration. Assistant Attorney General Julia Doyle Bernhardt argued that the executive branch does not hold the sole power to appoint, because it is a shared power between the executive and the Senate. However, Maloney argued that Hogan was within his rights to appoint both Schrader and Peters.

Maloney told the court, “If the General Assembly can do this, if they basically can chop off their heads, if you will, budgetarily by simply placing language on Cabinet members it doesn’t want to appoint, here it would be recess appointments and next week it could be something else. It really deprives the executive of the inherent executive authority to make recess appointments.”

Maloney is a preeminent trial lawyer who has obtained millions of dollars in recoveries for his clients in a wide variety of matters, including civil rights, employment discrimination, whistleblower actions and high-stakes business litigation. He is a committed advocate for the public good who has held leadership roles with many civic and charitable organizations.

Click below to read the full article:

Md. Appointments Appeal Could Hinge on Interpretation of Governor’s Powers